You are here

Spotlighting Howard University

February 27, 2012 - 2:45pm

Addthis

Students at Howard University are helping to solve one of the biggest challenges facing renewable energy. | Photo by Jim Pleasant.

Students at Howard University are helping to solve one of the biggest challenges facing renewable energy. | Photo by Jim Pleasant.

Students at Washington, D.C.’s Howard University are helping to solve one of the biggest challenges facing renewable energy: how to introduce renewable resource-integrated networks to the nation’s electricity grid.
 
Thanks in part to funding by the Energy Department’s Minority University Research Associates (MURA) Program, the hands-on research of students at Howard seeks to address operational challenges (like regulation and technical barriers) as well as behavioral and economic issues that currently stand in the way of fully realizing the benefits of “renewable energy resource integrated networks,” which will allow the further incorporation of renewable power to the entire grid.
 
Researchers at the school’s Center for Energy Systems and Control (known as CESaC) are working on a project that focuses on developing and studying enhanced variable models to evaluate and optimize the effects of introducing renewable energy resource-integrated networks to the greater distribution grid. When renewable energy resources are combined for a shared purpose, they create a more efficient network of power systems that can lower costs and increase reliability for consumers. The team was awarded $350,858 for the three-year project at the center, which pioneers research in several different types of energy systems.    
 
In addition to the work being done at CESaC, more cutting-edge research is underway at the Georgetown-Howard Universities Center for Clinical & Translational Science (GHUCCTS), which promotes clinical research and translational science (and of which the Department’s Oak Ridge National Lab is also a member).
 
To find out more about the exciting energy research and discoveries at Howard, visit the Office of Scientific and Technical Information’s January/February 2012 .EDUconnections Spotlight.

Addthis