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Photo of the Week: Controlling Chaos with Magnetic Fields

January 18, 2013 - 11:26am

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This artistic rendition of "spin vortices" illustrates tiny magnetic vortices that spin according to the polarization of each disk's vortex core. At Argonne National Laboratory, scientists are using alternating magnetic fields to control the behavior of these spin vortices, which are small dots made of iron and nickel. The experiments will help to create new, more efficient magnetic devices -- like the random access memory (RAM) in the device you are using to look at this very photo. <a href="http://www.anl.gov/articles/chaotic-spin-vortices-could-lead-new-computer-memories" target="_blank">Learn more about spin vortices</a>. | Photo courtesy of Sander Munster, Dresden University of Technology.

This artistic rendition of "spin vortices" illustrates tiny magnetic vortices that spin according to the polarization of each disk's vortex core. At Argonne National Laboratory, scientists are using alternating magnetic fields to control the behavior of these spin vortices, which are small dots made of iron and nickel. The experiments will help to create new, more efficient magnetic devices -- like the random access memory (RAM) in the device you are using to look at this very photo. Learn more about spin vortices. | Photo courtesy of Sander Munster, Dresden University of Technology.

Every week, we'll feature our favorite energy-related photo here on Energy.gov, at Facebook.com/Energygov, on Twitter via @ENERGY and on our Flickr photostream. For other photos of the week, view our gallery. If you have ideas for Photo of the Week, send us an email at NewMedia@hq.doe.gov.

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